death-by-lulz:

Dogs copying a baby crawling.

Featured on a 1000Notes.com blog

It helps me see things closer. Even if they’re not very far away. I pretend it’s my magic power. - Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

(Source: cybillshepherd, via agirlinaworldfullofbadbitches)

architags:

Gres House. Luciano Kruk. Itauna. Brasil. under construction. images (c) Luciano Kruk

This is an amazing idea for a house

(via maltbyclothiers)

productoftheinternet:

imisscalifornia:

this is my favorite thing

Gotta reblog this again

(Source: wildpens)

thewildswan:

Illustration by Bernie Fuchs, 1960’s.Courtesy of Charlie Allen.

thewildswan:

Illustration by Bernie Fuchs, 1960’s.
Courtesy of Charlie Allen.

(via thequarterrat)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 14, 1865: Abraham Lincoln Is Shot
On this day in 1865, John Wilkes Booth, a supporter of the Confederacy and of slavery, shot Lincoln as the president and his wife watched a performance at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C.
The president died the next morning, and Vice President Andrew Johnson entered the nation’s highest office.
Chronicle the life of the 16th President of the United States with American Experience’s Abraham Lincoln biography. 

Photo: An 1863 daguerreotype of Lincoln, at the age of 54.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 14, 1865: Abraham Lincoln Is Shot

On this day in 1865, John Wilkes Booth, a supporter of the Confederacy and of slavery, shot Lincoln as the president and his wife watched a performance at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C.

The president died the next morning, and Vice President Andrew Johnson entered the nation’s highest office.

Chronicle the life of the 16th President of the United States with American Experience’s Abraham Lincoln biography

Photo: An 1863 daguerreotype of Lincoln, at the age of 54.

todaysdocument:

“Don’t wish to disturb you”
On the afternoon of April 14, 1865, just hours before he assassinated President Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth left this calling card for Vice President Andrew Johnson at his Washington D.C. hotel. Booth’s co-conspirator, George Atzerodt was to kill Johnson that night, but he lost his nerve and did not make an attempt. Historians continue to debate why Booth left his card with Johnson. 

Calling card left by John Wilkes Booth. National Archives, Records of the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Army)

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)

Booth’s calling card is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

todaysdocument:

“Don’t wish to disturb you”

On the afternoon of April 14, 1865, just hours before he assassinated President Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth left this calling card for Vice President Andrew Johnson at his Washington D.C. hotel. Booth’s co-conspirator, George Atzerodt was to kill Johnson that night, but he lost his nerve and did not make an attempt. Historians continue to debate why Booth left his card with Johnson. 

Calling card left by John Wilkes Booth. National Archives, Records of the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Army)

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)

Booth’s calling card is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

(via to-the-manner-born)

cvilletochucktown:

Born April 13, 1743, in Shadwell, Virginia 
Happy Birthday, Tom

cvilletochucktown:

Born April 13, 1743, in Shadwell, Virginia 

Happy Birthday, Tom

(via maxminimus)